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What Are Plasma Protein Therapies?

Plasma protein therapies are unique medications whose production begins with plasma, the straw-colored liquid portion of blood comprised of water, salts, and proteins.

Plasma protein therapies treat medical conditions by replacing missing or deficient proteins found in plasma, to allow their recipients to lead healthier and more productive lives. The patients who rely on plasma protein therapies generally require regular infusions or injections for the duration of their lives.

These plasma protein therapies include immunoglobulins, to treat immunodeficiencies, Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP), a rare disorder of the peripheral nerves, and Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP), a bleeding disorder in which the immune system destroys platelets.

Hyperimmune Globulins are used in the prevention and treatment of specific infections and other foreign bodies. Alpha-1 Proteinase Inhibitors helps treat Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency, Albumin is used in emergency and surgical medicine, and C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) is used to treat Hereditary Angioedema, a rare but potentially life-threatening condition.

Plasma contains numerous proteins, which are essential for proper functioning of the body. If a person has insufficient levels of any one plasma protein, his or her body cannot carry out vital functions, causing a variety of chronic and life-threatening medical conditions. However, the plasma in these plasma protein therapies cannot be recreated in a laboratory and need to be donated. No generics or substitutions exist. These patients can only rely on plasma donors. Patients with chronic illness rely on donors like you to help keep them alive. In addition to saving lives donors also aid in the process of developing medicines for our everyday lives. That is why donating plasma is so important.

Plasma contains numerous proteins, which are essential for proper functioning of the body. If a person has insufficient levels of any one plasma protein, his or her body cannot carry out vital functions, causing a variety of chronic and life-threatening medical conditions. However, the plasma in these plasma protein therapies cannot be recreated in a laboratory and need to be donated. No generics or substitutions exist. These patients can only rely on plasma donors.

These therapies are used to treat a number of rare, chronic, conditions including primary immunodeficiencies, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, hereditary angioedema, alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, Rh incompatibility cardiopulmonary needs, pediatric HIV, burn victims, hepatitis, certain liver conditions, shock/trauma victims, and bleeding disorders such as hemophilia.

In addition to helping those with rare, chronic diseases, plasma protein therapies are also used in everyday medicine, emergencies, and surgical medicine to treat animal bites, Hepatitis, organ transplants, shock, burns, pediatric HIV, trauma, liver conditions, cardiopulmonary issues, and RH incompatibility.

Patients with chronic illness rely on donors like you to help keep them alive. In addition to saving lives donors also aid in the process of developing medicines for our everyday lives. That is why donating plasma is so important. You can learn more about plasma protein therapies from The Plasma Protein Therapeutics Association (PPTA).